Search for squid - 59 results found

oregano-roasted squid; boiled potatoes, chives; lacinato

I must have appeared flummoxed.

Warren said I should have the squid.

The fisherman was right. We love squid [58 results show up on this blog], it had been a while since I’d served it, it was definitely very fresh. preparing it as I do is a pretty low key operation, and it was delicious.

  • once the oven had been heated to 400º, just over a pound of very fresh squid, bodies and tentacles, from American Seafood Company, rinsed and very carefully dried, quickly arranged inside a large rectangular enameled cast iron pan that had been heated on top of the stove until hot and its the cooking surface brushed with olive oil once the oil itself had become quite hot, immediately sprinkled with a heaping teaspoon of super-pungent dried Sicilian oregano from Buon Italia, a good section of a peperoncino Calabresi secchia from Buon Italia, and a section of light-colored home-dried habanada pepper (purchased fresh from Norwich Meadows Farm last season), sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper, followed by a full 3 tablespoons of juice from an organic Chelsea Whole Foods lemon and a splash of olive oil, the pan placed inside the hot oven and the squid roasted for just 5 minutes, by which time their bodies had ballooned somewhat, the squid removed and arranged on 2 plates and ladled with the cooking juices that had been transferred to a footed glass sauce boat
  • just under a pound of amazingly sweet Natasha potatoes from Phillips Farms, scrubbed, boiled unpeeled in generously-salted water until barely cooked through, drained, halved, dried in the still-warm large vintage Corning Pyrex Flameware blue-glass pot in which they had cooked, tossed with a little Trader Joe’s Italian Reserve extra virgin olive oil, seasoned with salt and pepper, and tossed with scissored fresh chives, also from Phillips Farms
  • one bouquet of cavolo nero (aka lacinato, Tuscan kale, or black kale, and other names as well) from Eckerton Hill Farm, the leaves stripped from their stems (which is difficult when the cabbage leaves are as then as these were) wilted briefly inside a large heavy antique tin-lined copper pot in a tablespoon or so of olive oil after several halved cloves of garlic, also from Norwich Meadows, had first been heated there until fragrant and softened, the greens seasoned with salt and pepper and drizzled with a little more oil

  • the music was a live recording of a tribute concert entitled ‘Glenn Gould – Remodels’, which was a part of a series of exhibitions and concerts dedicated to and marking the 2017 85th birthday of Glenn Gould, curated by Ryuichi Sakamoto, with Alva Noto+Nilo, Christian Fennesz, and Francesco Tristano

[the image of their Maremma vineyard is from the Tenuta Sassoregale site; the ‘Glenn Gould Gathering’ album cover is from Leticia García (twitter @Ms_Golightly)]

oregano/chili/habanada/lemon-roasted squid; spinach

Oh so good.

On my way home from the Greenmarket with these Cephalopoda on Wednesday I thought about how many people think of squid only as an appetizer, usually batter-coated and deep-fried, which can be awesome, but that we almost always enjoy them at home as the special main event I think their goodness deserves.

  • one pound of rinsed and carefully dried baby squid from American Seafood Company, quickly arranged inside a large rectangular enameled cast iron pan that had been heated on top of the stove until hot and its the cooking surface brushed with olive oil, and once the oil itself was quite hot, immediately sprinkled with a heaping teaspoon of super-pungent dried Sicilian oregano from Buon Italia, a good section of a peperoncino Calabresi secchia from Buon Italia, and a section of light-colored home-dried habanada pepper (purchased fresh from Norwich Meadows Farm), sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper, followed by 3 tablespoons of juice from an organic Chelsea Whole Foods lemon, and a splash of olive oil, the pan placed inside a pre-heated 400º oven and the squid roasted for just less than 5 minutes, by which time their little bodies had ballooned, then removed, the squid distributed onto 2 plates and ladled with the cooking juices, once they’d been transferred to a footed glass sauce boat
  • seven or eight ounces of loose spinach from Tamarack Hollow Farm washed in several changes of water, drained, very gently wilted (that is, not reduced too far) inside a large, heavy, antique high-sided tin-lined copper pot in a little olive oil in which 3 quartered cloves of ‘music garlic’ from Windfall Farms had first been allowed to sweat, the spinach seasoned with salt, pepper, and a little dried peperoncino, finished on the plates with a little more olive oil
  • slices of ‘table bread’ from Philadelphia’s Lost Bread Co

There was a cheese course, at least partly as a reward for my success in getting dinner started earlier than usual.

  • two cheeses, a semi-firm Riverine Ranch water buffalo ‘farm stand cheese’, and a “mammuth’ goat milk cheese (camembert style) from Ardith Mae, with a little roughly pounded black pepper and some Maldon salt on the plate
  • more slices of Lost Bread’s ‘table bread’

 

[the image of the bical grapes is from this 2018 Eric Azimov New York Times article; the image from the Los Angeles Philharmonic fully staged world premiere of Andriessen’s ‘Theatre of the World’ from the blog, Louis Andriessen]

squid/conch salad, arugula; toasted orecciette, mustards

The antipasto was ‘prepared food’ (prepared by the wife of our local fisherman), with the addition of a bit of greens, and the locally-made pasta that followed only needed a little working, and that too included a bit of greenery, as local as that which had accompanied the sseafood salad.

  • eight ounces of a squid and conch salad (including olive oil, parsley, red pepper, lemon juice) from P.E. & D.D. Seafood in the Union Square Greenmarket, made by Dolores Karlin, the wife of Phil Karlin, the fisherman himself, arranged on a thin bed of arugula from Norwich Meadows Farm, the seasoning of the salad adjusted, including a drizzle of juice from a Chelsea While Foods Market organic lemon
  • leaves of peppery arugula from Norwich Meadows Farm, dressed with a good olive oil, sea salt, freshly ground black pepper, and a drizzle lemon juice, arranged as a bed for the salad
  • slices of a superb 100% whole wheat bread from the bakery at Runner & Stone

Because both courses were so easily assembled, the water for the pasta could be heated while we were still enjoying the seafood salad, meaning there was no serious interruption before moving on the pasta.

  • a few handfuls of roughly cut purple mustard greens from Lani’s Farm, stirred into a little olive oil inside a large vintage copper pot in which 2 small cloves of sliced ‘music garlic’ from Windfall Farms had been allowed to sweat, seasoned with salt and pepper, and set aside while 8 ounces of a very good Agricola del Sole orecciette di grana arso from Flatiron Eataly had been cooked al dente, the pasta then drained, transferred into the pot with the garlic and greens, and seasoned with salt, pepper, and a pinch of an Eckerton Hill Farm crushed dried hickory smoked Jamaican Scotch bonnet pepper, some of the pasta cooking water added and the mix stirred over a high lame until the liquid had emulsified, then arranged inside shallow bowls and served tossed with some grated Sini Fulvi Pecorino Romano D.O.C. from the Chelsea Whole Foods Market, finishing with a drizzle of olive oil around the edges

 

oregano/habanada/lemon-roasted squid; potatoes; sprouts

It had to be assembled fairly fast, because we were going to be at The Kitchen earlier that night, and we expected to arrive home late, after our second experience of Varispeed’s magnificent performance of Robert Ashley’s opera, ‘Improvement (Don Leaves Linda)’.

My first choice at the Greenmarket fish stall (it was Wednesday, meaning the American Seafood Company would be there) had been tuna, because it really can make for a quick meal, but, learning that it wasn’t the season, I turned to the baby squid, which can be prepared just about as fast.

  • one pound of rinsed and carefully dried baby squid from American Seafood Company, quickly arranged inside a large rectangular enameled cast iron pan that had been heated on top of the stove until hot and its the cooking surface brushed with olive oil, then, once the oil was also quite hot, immediately sprinkled with a heaping teaspoon of super-pungent dried Sicilian oregano from Buon Italia, a good section of a peperoncino Calabresi secchia from Buon Italia, and a section of light-colored home-dried habanada pepper (purchased fresh from Norwich Meadows Farm), sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper, followed by a douse of 3 tablespoons of juice from an organic Whole Foods lemon, and a splash of olive oil, the pan placed inside a pre-heated 400º oven and the squid roasted for only about 5 minutes, by which time their little bodies had ballooned, removed, the squid distributed onto 2 plates and ladled with the cooking juices, once they’d been transferred to a footed glass sauce boat
  • almost a pound of pinto potatoes from Norwich Meadows Farm, scrubbed, boiled unpeeled in generously-salted water until barely cooked through, drained, halved, dried in the still-warm large vintage Corning Pyrex Flameware blue-glass pot in which they had cooked, tossed with a little Trader Joe’s Italian Reserve extra virgin olive oil, seasoned with salt and pepper, tossed with some chopped lovage from Two Guys from Woodbridge
  • sunflower sprouts, from Windfall Farms, naked
  • the wine was a Portuguese (Beira) white, Vinhas Velhas Branco, Luis Pato 2016, from Astor Wines
  • the music was Martin Bresnick’s ‘Opere della musica povera’, including several ensembles and soloists (we listened to both superb CDs)

squid/conch salad, cress; culotte; roast potatoes; tomatoes

With a little extra help from the Greenmarket.

The first course required little more talent than an ability to open a container.

  • eight ounces of a squid and conch salad, with olive oil, parsley, red pepper, lemon juice from P.E. & D.D. Seafood in the Union Square Greenmarket, made by Delores Karlin, the wife of Phil Karlin, the fisherman, arranged on a thin bed of wild cress from Lani’s Farm
  • slices of a levain (organic wheat, whole wheat, and whole spelt flours) from Bread Alone
  • the wine was a Portuguese (Lisbon) white, Dory Branco 2016, from Garnet Wines

The second course was almost as easy, for several different reasons: The potatoes almost cooked themselves, as did the steak, whose sauce was simply resurrected from the freezer, and preparing the tomatoes, which didn’t require cooking, was simply a matter of cutting them up, mixing them with a few things I had on hand, and then letting them sit for a spell.

  • two sirloin cap steaks (aka ‘culotte’ steak, ‘coulotte’ in France, or ‘picanha’ in Brazil) from Sun Fed Beef in the 23rd Street Market at Saturday’s Chelsea’s Down to Earth Farmers Market, one block away from us, weighing approximately 12 ounces together, each divided into 2 pieces because they were very different in weight, brought to room temperature, seasoned on all sides with sea salt and freshly-ground black pepper, seared for less than a minute on the top, thick, fat-covered side inside a dry oval enameled heavy cast iron pan, the 2 long sides cooked for 3 or 4 minutes each, then removed from the pan at the moment they had become perfectly medium-rare and arranged on 2 warm plates, topped with a pat of a little toasted yellow mustard and Sicilian fennel seed butter (a leftover, frozen, that had originally been made for a rack of lamb meal 4 months earlier, the steaks allowed to rest for about 4 minutes before being served

  • a few small red thumb fingerlings from Norwich Meadows Farm, halved lengthwise, tossed with a little oil, 4 or 5 unpeeled (to keep from burning) rocambole garlic cloves from Keith’s Farm, a small amount of crushed dried habanada pepper, sea salt, and freshly-ground black pepper, roasted inside a medium Pampered Chef ceramic oven pan, cut side down, in a 400º oven for less about 20 minutes

  • three organic tomatoes, each of a different color, from Toigo Orchards, cut into relatively thin wedges, mixed gently inside a medium bowl with 2 thinly sliced fresh grenada verde peppers and one fresh habanada, pepper, a squeeze of an organic lemon from Whole Foods Market Chelsea, and a little olive oil, allowed to rest until the steak and potatoes were ready to be served, at which time they were joined by a small mix of several chopped fresh herbs and a quite small drizzle of balsamic vinegar
  • the wine was a Spanish (Rioja) red, CVNE (Cune), Rioja Crianza “Vina Real”, 2014, from Flatiron Wines
  • the music was Walter Braunfels, ‘Die Vogel’, in a performance with Lothar Zagrosek conducting the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin and the Berlin Radio Chorus heard on a CD recording we had purchased soon after it was released in 1997